Pacific Northwest Chicken Noodle Soup

Upon getting sick, often I turn to finding ways to distract myself while finding comfort where possible. The Universe took me down with a sinus infection this week, but fortunately we were asked to contribute a few recipes for an upcoming Farm to Fork article in our local paper. What I came up with was the traditional chicken noodle soup my Mom used to make me whenever I fell ill as a child, but with a Pacific Northwest twist.

Most of the ingredients needed you can find at your local farmer’s market! We encourage everyone to shop locally for produce! This last weekend I came home with a bag of Chanterelle mushrooms that were calling to be put in something special! They added great a great flavor and texture to Mom’s recipe!

This chicken noodle soup is bold, with a kick! We love garlic and spices in this house, so we never hold back! It helped give me back some energy while providing a warm, nutritious meal for our family on a chilly November day!

Give it a try and tell us what you think!

  • 4 TBSP of Butter of Ghee
  • 1 Large thick  diced onion
  • 5 Celery stalks with their leaves
  • 1 1/2 cups of sliced carrots
  • 1 Full Ear of Garlic, peeled and diced – Yes, that much!
  • 1 lb of diced chicken (local, free range chicken is always best if you can find it!)
  • 1 TSP Thyme
  • 1 TBSP Parsley
  • 4 or 5 Rosemary leaves, crushed
  • Salt & Pepper to taste
  • 2 TBSP Olive Oil
  • 1 Carton of diced Chanterelle Mushrooms
  • 7 Cups of Water
  • 1 Cup of Egg Noodles – For other options try rice or hemp seeds!

 

  1. First add butter or ghee to a stockpot and melt over medium high heat. Immediately add in carrots, celery, and onion. Saute, stirring occasionally, for 8-10 minutes until carrots are softer and onions are opaque.
  2. Add in 2 olive oil, diced chicken and garlic, thyme, parsley, rosemary, salt & pepper. Cook for another 5 minutes.
  3. Add in the Chanterelle mushrooms and continue to stir and saute for 5 more minutes.
  4. Add in water and simmer on medium high for an hour.
  5. Add in noodles 15 minutes before you are ready to serve!
  6. Enjoy!

 

 

 

Start Healing with Raw Local Honey

Honey has been a staple in the human diet since ancient times. It has an unusual chemical composition which prevents it from spoiling. Archaeologists have unearthed pots that are thousands of years old that are still good. Honey is low in moisture and high in acid, making bacteria and microorganisms unable to grow. Bees add glucose oxidase, an enzyme, to it that creates hydrogen peroxide as a byproduct. Honey is antibacterial and anti-inflammatory.

Honey is great for:

Soothing a sore throat or cough –

Do you have a nagging cough? Kids can’t sleep? Give them 2 TBSP of honey and you’ll be good to go! Honey provides natural relief from sore throats by coating the throat and reducing inflammation! This is a much safer go-to than drug store cough syrups!

If you want to give it an extra kick, pour your jar of honey into a saucepan with a few sage leaves, and some ground up ginger. Add in fresh squeezed lemon juice. Simmer for 30 minutes on med-low. Let it cool and put back into the jar! Keep this syrup in the refrigerator for up a year. Add to a hot cup of water, spoon it out for the kids, or enjoy in tea! The taste is wonderful! You can play with adding other spices if you enjoy more of a kick! Cloves, garlic, or turmeric also add a power punch to this syrup!

Treat Wounds –

Honey has been found to kill all strains of bacteria in wounds. For the treatment of burns and wounds, WebMD notes: Honey is applied directly or in a dressing which is usually changed every 24 to 48 hours. When used directly, 15 mL to 30 mL of honey has been applied every 12 to 48 hours, and covered with sterile gauze and bandages or a polyurethane dressing.

Why use synthetic rub on creams when you can just go to the kitchen?

Natural Sweetener –

Processed sugars are a thorn in our country’s side. Surprisingly honey can be added to most recipes in place of sugar. The conversion is really simple:

For every 1 cup of granulated sugar, replace it with 1/3 cup of raw honey!

Honey contains small amounts of a wide array of vitamins and minerals, including niacin, riboflavin, calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium and zinc.

Seasonal Allergy Relief –

We strongly believe that by taking 2 TBSP of honey a day you can naturally ease the symptoms of seasonal allergies. Honey contains traces of flower pollen, and exposure to small amounts of allergens works as a good treatment to combat daily symptoms.

Again, a sweet bite of honey is a lot less complicated than a synthetic alternative. However, if you need an over the counter aid after trying the honey then do so! We advocate in trying the natural option first, every time!

Kills bacteria –

In clinical studies, medical grade honey has been shown to kill food-borne illness pathogens like E. coli and salmonella, as well as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, both of which are common in hospitals and doctors’ offices.

While we aim to learn more about the beekeeping process over the next few years. We distribute honey at the Umpqua Valley Farmer’s Market each weekend for our friends at Humble Bee Honey! Their local raw honey is fabulously rich and you can’t beat the flavor!

Make life a little bit sweeter and reach out to your local Farmer’s Markets and Bee-Keepers  today to add more local honey into your diet! You wont regret it!